Posts Tagged ‘ intellectual property ’

If you build a censorship machine, they will come

September 20, 2016
posted by

Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Foundation
by Mitch Stoltz  

"If you have the power to censor other people's speech, special interests will try to co-opt that power for their own purposes. That's a lesson the Motion Picture Association of America is learning this year. And it's one that Internet intermediaries, and the special interests who want to regulate them, need to keep in mind." (09/19/16)

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/09/if-you-build-censorship-machine-they-will-come  

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Lies, damned lies, and Hewlett-Packard printers

September 20, 2016
posted by

Thomas L Knapp -- photo by Avens O'Brien William Lloyd Garrison Center for Libertarian Advocacy Journalism
by Thomas L Knapp  

"September 13 was an unlucky day for an unknown number of Hewlett-Packard printer owners. Instead of going dutifully to work, their printers displayed the error message 'One or more cartridges appear to be damaged. Remove them and replace them with new cartridges.' The cartridges weren't damaged, though. The printers had been sabotaged with, for all intents and purposes, malware. And the saboteur was Hewlett-Packard itself. The company built a digital time bomb into its firmware to stop owners of HP printers from using ink cartridges sold by third parties." (09/19/16)

http://thegarrisoncenter.org/archives/7648  

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European copyright ruling ushers in new dark era for hyperlinks

September 11, 2016
posted by

Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Foundation
by Jeremy Malcolm  

"In a case which threatens to cause turmoil for thousands if not millions of websites, the Court of Justice of the European Union decided today that a website that merely links to material that infringes copyright, can itself be found guilty of copyright infringement, provided only that the operator knew or could reasonably have known that the material was infringing. Worse, they will be presumed to know of this if the links are provided for 'the pursuit of financial gain.'" (09/08/16)

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/09/european-copyright-ruling-ushers-new-dark-era-hyperlinks  

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EpiPen: A case study of government harm

August 31, 2016
posted by

John R. Graham Independent Institute
by John R Graham  

"Much has been written about the dramatic price hikes for EpiPen, a product that injects a drug that counters severe allergic reactions (anaphylactic shock). ... EpiPen is complicated, being both a drug and a device. The drug is very inexpensive, and not patented. The device is protected by patents issued in 2005, which expire in 2025. First, the government made a couple of interventions in the market that allowed the manufacturer to raise prices above the free-market level. The federal government changed its guidelines such that EpiPens must be sold in packages of two (even though customers might prefer just one, or at least an odd number). Also, the feds gave public-emergency grants to states on the condition that they stockpile EpiPens. Further, the Food and Drug Administration has hindered other manufacturers' ability to compete." (08/30/16)

http://blog.independent.org/2016/08/30/epipen-a-case-study-of-government-harm/  

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CloudFlare protects Internet users by insisting on lawful orders before blocking customers

August 24, 2016
posted by

Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Foundation
by Mitch Stoltz  

"This month, the online service provider CloudFlare stood up for its website-owner customers, and for all users of those websites, by telling a court that CloudFlare shouldn't be forced to block sites without proper legal procedure. Copyright law limits the kinds of orders that a court can impose on Internet intermediaries, and requires courts to consider the pros and cons thoroughly. In this case, as in other recent cases, copyright (and trademark) holders are trying to use extremely broad interpretations of some basic court rules to bypass these important protections. As special interests keep trying to make things disappear from the Internet quickly, cheaply, and without true court supervision, it's more important than ever that Internet companies like CloudFlare are taking a stand." (08/23/16)

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/08/cloudflare-protects-internet-users-insisting-lawful-orders-blocking-customers  

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Why “reforming” copyright will kill it

August 21, 2016
posted by

Kevin Carson Center for a Stateless Society
by Kevin Carson  

[E]liminating the legal enforcement of DRM -- by criminal, mind, not civil law -- would effectively destroy all business models based on proprietary digital information, both in the 'information industries' as such and in manufacturing. And these are, mind you, the primary source of profit in today's global corporate economy. Interestingly enough, thinkers like Doctorow and Lawrence Lessig say they're not against copyright -- they just want to reform it and make it more reasonable. But from what we've seen above, it's absolutely dependent on police state measures like the DMCA and the 'intellectual property' provisions in 'Free Trade' Agreements like TPP for its survival in any remotely recognizable form." (08/21/16)

https://c4ss.org/content/46045  

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Free culture benefits everyone but the middleman

August 18, 2016
posted by

Kevin Carson Center for a Stateless Society
by Kevin Carson  

"Swiss photographer Samuel Zeller has discovered the benefits -- to his livelihood! -- of putting his work in the public domain. He's put a lot of his work into the public domain via Creative Commons CC0 licenses, and published it on the Unsplash hosting site. The resulting 63 million views and 613,000 downloads have driven enormous traffic to his online portfolio and given him all the new business he can handle. In short, 'giving away' your past work for free amounts to free advertising for your paid services. That's a fairly common -- and successful -- strategy: giving away free content, but bundling it with other paid services. ... Trying to make money by paywalling your content and punishing those who share it is a guaranteed strategy for reducing sales." (08/18/16)

https://c4ss.org/content/45961  

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Tell your university: Don’t sell patents to trolls

August 18, 2016
posted by

Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Foundation
by Elliot Harmon  

"When universities invent, those inventions should benefit everyone. Unfortunately, they sometimes end up in the hands of patent trolls -- companies that serve no purpose but to amass patents and demand money from others. When a university sells patents to trolls, it undermines the university's purpose as a driver of innovation. Those patents become landmines that make innovation more difficult." (08/17/16)

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/08/tell-your-university-dont-sell-patents-trolls  

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Remove intellectual property rights — patents and copyright — to enhance prosperity

August 11, 2016
posted by

The Daily Bell
by staff  

"The disease of government is like an ineradicable plague that sickens without ceasing. Now patent and copyright law have been extending in the UK and EU. Why should we pay to provide you the privilege of exclusivity? Especially when we are well aware that only a relative few benefit substantially from intellectual property rights. Musicians don't benefit from these laws for the most part, though the record companies do. Authors don't benefit from these laws for the most part, though their publishers do. As for inventors generally, would they really cease to tinker if they couldn't patent their inventions?" (08/10/16)

http://www.thedailybell.com/news-analysis/remove-intellectual-property-rights-patents-and-copyright-and-watch-prosperity-explode/  

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Stand up for open access. Stand up for Diego.

August 9, 2016
posted by

Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Foundation
by Ana Acosta and Elliot Harmon  

"EFF believes that extreme criminal penalties for copyright infringement can chill people's right of free expression, limit the public's access to knowledge, and quell scientific research. That’s particularly true in countries like Colombia that pay lip service to free speech and access to education (which are expressly recognized as basic rights in Colombia's Constitution) but don't have the robust fair use protections that help ensure copyright doesn't stymie those commitments. Diego's case also serves as a wake-up call: it’s time for open access to become the global standard for academic publishing." (08/09/16)

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/08/stand-open-access  

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It’s time to destroy Elsevier (just for starters)

August 9, 2016
posted by

Kevin Carson Center for a Stateless Society
by Kevin Carson  

"Just this past May, Elsevier -- the most notorious of the price-gouging proprietary academic publishing crime families -- acquired the open-access academic repository SSRN. That's right -- a publisher that charges $30 to access 30-year-old papers is closing off free legal alternatives while simultaneously whining about sharing sites like Sci-Hub. Meanwhile, a Science magazine survey found 88% of respondents consider it morally acceptable to access 'pirated' articles for free on sharing websites, and 25% actually do so weekly ('In survey, most give thumbs-up to pirated papers,' Science, May 6). Now more than ever there's a crying need for someone to do to academic publishing what the file-sharing movement did to the music industry." (08/09/16)

https://c4ss.org/content/45923  

1 Comment »

Verizon-Yahoo deal shows once again the need to remove intellectual property rights

July 27, 2016
posted by

The Daily Bell
by staff  

"If people believe the pace of technological innovation has slowed in the past years, they are probably correct. As ZeroHedge pointed out in May, 'Venture capital investments in Silicon Valley fell almost 20 percent in the first quarter [of 2016] from a year earlier to $4.9 billion.' We would argue this is part of a larger trend. With such gigantic companies dominating the Internet, there is less room for groundbreaking innovation. These large companies act as gatekeepers, preserving what has already been accomplished and ensuring to a large degree that what is now developed doesn’t threaten what has come before. As usual, intellectual property rights are at fault." ()7/26/16)

http://www.thedailybell.com/news-analysis/verizon-yahoo-deal-shows-once-again-the-need-to-remove-intellectual-property-rights/  

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In defense of torrents

July 25, 2016
posted by

Darryl W Perry Free Press Publications
by Darryl W Perry  

"With much fanfare from the Department of Justice, the alleged operator of the largest torrent site, Artem Vaulin, was arrested in Poland and the website was seized. ... The DOJ is seeking to extradite Vaulin, who is Ukrainian, from Poland to the United States where he is charged with one count of conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement, one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering and two counts of criminal copyright infringement for allegedly operating the website Kickass Torrents (KAT). ... there are a lot of similarities between the Silk Road and Kickass Torrents. First off, three simple facts of the Silk Road case: Ross Ulbricht created a website; people used the website to sell things that other people wanted to buy; Ross Ulbricht was sent to jail for the rest of his life. Now, three three simple facts of the KAT case: Artem Vaulin allegedly created a website; people used the website to share digital copies of things that other people wanted; Artem Vaulin could be sent to jail for the next 20 years." [text, Flash audio or MP3] (07/24/16)

http://fpp.cc/in-defense-of-torrents/  

1 Comment »

Section 1201 of the DMCA cannot pass constitutional scrutiny

July 21, 2016
posted by

Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Foundation
by Kit Walsh  

"Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act forbids a wide range of speech, from remix videos that rely upon circumvention, to academic security research, to publication of software that can help repair your car or back up your favorite show. It potentially implicates the entire range of speech that relies on access to copyrighted works or describes flaws in access controls -- even where that speech is clearly noninfringing." (07/21/16)

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/07/section-1201-dmca-cannot-pass-constitutional-scrutiny  

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US govthugs steal filesharing site’s domains and bank accounts; counterparts in Poland abduct site owner

July 21, 2016
posted by

CNet News CNet News    

"U.S. authorities announced that they [sic] have arrested Artem Vaulin, the alleged owner of the most-visited file sharing site online: Kickass Torrents (or KAT). A federal court in Chicago also ordered that a bank account and seven domain names believed to be associated with KAT be seized. ... if Poland cooperates with the U.S. in the extradition process, Vaulin will be tried in American courts on counts of conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement, conspiracy to commit money laundering, and two counts of criminal copyright infringement." (07/21/16)

http://www.cnet.com/news/u-s-authorities-seize-kickass-torrents-domains/  

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The Minneapolis Police Department is a bit red in the face

July 15, 2016
posted by

A Geek With Guns
by Christopher Burg  

"The Minneapolis Police Department is well known for its high speed, low drag attitude. Instead of deescalation and conflict avoidance the MPD prefers throwing down with anybody it can create an excuse to throw down with. In fact the department is so cocksure that it didn't even try to hide its love of violence in its recent recruiting video. However, many people weren't amused by the video so the MPD was a bit red in the fact and decided to abuse the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) in an attempt to erase the video from the Internet ..." (07/14/16)

https://blog.christopherburg.com/2016/07/14/the-minneapolis-police-department-is-a-bit-red-in-the-face/  

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Apple patents technology to remotely disable your iPhone camera at concerts

July 4, 2016
posted by

The Hacker News    

"Here's something you'll not like at all: Apple has been awarded a patent for technology that would prevent you from snapping pictures and shooting videos with your iPhone or iPad at places or events, like concerts or museums, where it might be prohibited or inappropriate. The patent, granted on Tuesday by the United States Patents and Trademark Office, is highly technical. Apple's latest patent describes an iPhone or iPad camera receiving coded infrared signals beamed from emitters in public places would temporarily disable device camera functionality, preventing any photography or recording for as long as the signal is on." [editor's note: Sounds like a giant "don't buy our product" advertisement to me - TLK] (07/01/16)

http://thehackernews.com/2016/07/apple-iphone-camera.html  

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Intellectual property is theft

July 1, 2016
posted by

Dan Sanchez Foundation for Economic Education
by Dan Sanchez  

"Property is the exclusive right to use this boat, this paper, this trap, these speakers, this computer, this plastic, or this aluminum. Monopoly is the exclusive right to use any boat to trade with India, to use any paper to make playing cards in 17th century England, to use any trap to catch beavers in North America, to use any speakers to play 'Happy Birthday,' to use any computer to deliver a podcast or download 'Happy Birthday,' to use any plastic and aluminum to build a certain kind of washing machine. Since it is an exclusive right to use any means in a certain way, intellectual 'property' is not property at all, but monopoly. Intellectual 'property' is therefore a misnomer, euphemistically used by state-privileged monopolists to drape their monopolies in the mantle of property." (06/30/16)

https://fee.org/articles/intellectual-property-is-theft/  

2 Comments »

A most bizarre misuse

June 27, 2016
posted by

Paul Jacob Common Sense
by Paul Jacob  

"Increasingly, folks in government balk at the commonsense requirement for transparency. They don't like the basic idea of a republic, apparently -- that we have rights; folks in government have duties. They are bound to serve us. And allow us to oversee their work. The latest bizarre attempt to wiggle out of transparency comes from California. A proposed bit of legislation, AB-2880, seeks to grant state employees copyright protection -- for their everyday work as public servants." (06/27/16)

http://thisiscommonsense.com/2016/06/27/a-most-bizarre-misuse/  

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Corporate “free trade” IS zero-sum

June 26, 2016
posted by

Kevin Carson Center for a Stateless Society
by Kevin Carson  

"A global corporation uses its patents and trademarks to contract out actual production to independent firms, but retains a legal monopoly on disposal of the product. As a result it can bargain unilaterally with foreign sweatshops on a take-it-or-leave-it basis, and sell the finished goods in Western domestic markets at a markup many times the actual cost of production. And it can use the same 'intellectual property' to prevent indigenous Third World producers from manufacturing identical goods for their own domestic market at a price near actual production cost. That is a ZERO-SUM game in which the corporations benefit at the expense of both Third World workers and American consumers." (06/25/16)

https://c4ss.org/content/45463  

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Mizzou’s control over its trademarks does not extend to control over student speech

June 16, 2016
posted by

Foundation for Individual Rights in Education Foundation for Individual Rights in Education
by Catherine Sevcenko  

"Universities exist to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas, and a vast range of opinions are represented on campus. For example, at Mizzou, registered student organizations include MU College Republicans and MU Tigers for Universal Health Care. Similarly, the university sponsors the MU Baha'i Association, the MU Buddhist Association, and the MU Skeptics, Atheists, Secular Humanists and Agnostics. It would be logically impossible for Mizzou to endorse the views of all these groups, even though it lends its name to each one. ... Mizzou wants to do more than remove its name from MU NORML's T-shirts. As Chief Judge James E. Gritzner pointed out in refusing to dismiss the parallel ISU case, 'Simply because the allegations involve the use of Iowa State University's licensed trademarks does not take away the suit's constitutional nature.'" [editor's note: Simple solution: Forbid government institutions to own trademarks; slightly more complicated, but even better: Do away with the anti-concept of "intellectual property" altogether - TLK] (06/15/16)

https://www.thefire.org/mizzous-control-over-its-trademarks-does-not-extend-to-control-over-student-speech/  

1 Comment »

It’s time to shut down the most prolific patent troll in the country

June 1, 2016
posted by

Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Foundation
by Vera Ranieri  

"Jason [Cugle] runs Triple7Vaping.com, a small Maryland business that sells products online and ships them across the country. Jason doesn't run a high-tech operation: a customer orders a product, Jason manually composes an email letting that customer know the order had shipped, and packages are then sent out via tracked USPS mail. In January, a company called 'Shipping & Transit LLC' sent Jason -- via his company -- a demand letter, claiming that Jason's activities infringed four patents, and demanding a license fee of $25,000. In its demand letter, Shipping and Transit claimed to own various 'tracking and messaging technologies' that Jason's website allegedly infringed." (05/31/16)

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/05/its-time-shut-down-most-prolific-patent-troll-country  

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“Intellectual property” keeps right on killing

May 22, 2016
posted by

Kevin Carson Center for a Stateless Society
by Kevin Carson  

"Habitual apologists for agribusiness like Reason's Ron Bailey gushingly cite studies that show glyphosate, the 'active ingredient' in Roundup, are unlikely to cause cancer in the concentrations that appear in supermarket produce. But as it turns out, the focus on glyphosate was actually a distraction .... There's evidence ('New Evidence About the Dangers of Monsanto's Roundup,' The Intercept, May 17) that Roundup is indeed carcinogenic, especially in the concentrations that farm workers are exposed to. ... legally, Monsanto is required to make public only the active ingredient -- glyphosate -- itself. The 'inert ingredients' are all trade secrets, legally protected by so-called 'intellectual property.'" (05/21/16)

https://c4ss.org/content/45029  

16 Comments »

Cato, “Derby Pie” [TM], the “Super Bowl” [TM] and trademark law

May 8, 2016
posted by

Stephan Kinsella Center for the Study of Innovative Freedom
by Stephan Kinsella  

"In a recent Cato Podcast, Trademarks and Derby-Pie[TM], host Caleb Brown interviews Walter Olson about trademark law, with reference to a recent controversy where the Kentucky Derby was threatening restaurants from selling a 'Derby Pie' (see NPR, What's Inside A 'Derby Pie?' Maybe A Lawsuit Waiting To Happen), and similar absurd situations such as the NFL using trademark law to coerce companies not to use the term 'Super Bowl.' ... I was hoping this short podcast would condemn trademark law in general, as I have done, or at least condemn these uses of trademark as clear examples of abuse and injustice and as obviously incompatible with libertarian principles, as I have also done. But Olson nowhere clearly does either. Instead, he insinuates trademark law is an ostensible sensible policy (it's not) ..." (05/07/16)

http://c4sif.org/2016/05/cato-derby-pie-the-super-bowl-and-trademark-law/  

1 Comment »

Standardized DRM will make us less safe

May 5, 2016
posted by

Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Foundation
by Cory Doctorow  

"Earlier this year, an independent security researcher named Rotem Kerner came forward to disclose critical bugs in a digital video recorder that was integrated into over 70 vendors' CCTV-based security systems. The vulnerability is a grave one. These DVRs are designed to be connected to whole networks of security cameras. By compromising them, thieves can spy on their targets using the targets' own cameras. In fact, Kerner was part of a team at RSA who published a report in 2014 that showed that thieves were using these vulnerable system to locate and target cash-registers for robberies. ... CCTV and video recorders that include EME or other digital locks could effectively become off-limits to the sort of important disclosures that Kerner made last month. A researcher coming forward about vulnerabilities in a system that includes EME could risk criminal and civil punishments." (05/05/16)

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/04/standardized-drm-will-make-us-less-safe  

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